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Topic: Getting started (Read 877 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: Getting started

Reply #30
Oh, and I got a couple of pmags from Hudsongunner.com for a pretty good price.  WELCOME10 (all caps). gets 10 percent off.  I thought that was pretty good.  29.99 for 10 rounders before the discount,, and free shipping.

Re: Getting started

Reply #31
I'm not a fan of "chassis" stocks, but your FV12 (which comes with a POS stock) looks good, and will shoot much better with the aftermarket stock.
 
A couple of things to think about, if you haven't already  . . .

1)
Check youtube for videos on how to improve the Accutrigger. There are some easy, low-cost mods to improve this already good trigger.
2)
Unfortunately, the heavy FV12 barrel is not lapped, and the bore's surface has very heavy reamer marks, which will copper foul quickly, and the copper build-up will be VERY difficult to remove. Take a look at the Tubb's firelapping system which, if done properly, could smooth out the barrels bore and improve precision. If you have other rifles that could benefit from firelapping, you might consider just buying three different grits of lapping compound from Brownell's and "rolling your own" rather than buying the Tubb's system (good for one barrel only).


Re: Getting started

Reply #32
If you put a couple hundred rounds down it starting with a break-in of shoot & clean by the time you get the barrel settled it will be smoothed out and not catching copper anymore.

The final finish should help but I'd only use the fine grit bullets.
Dave

Re: Getting started

Reply #33
I agree with hufd63.. break it in good and then clean it good every 60 or 70 rounds and you should be good to go.. i tend to stay away from sending sand paper covered bullets down my barrels..
Grant

Re: Getting started

Reply #34
Not my experience with this barrel.

My FV12 barrel, the first factory barrel I've used in quite some time, was a fouler. Copper upon copper. VERY difficult to remove. About 200+ rounds, including break-in and vigorous cleanings between range sessions, did nothing to "smooth it out", as the copper just layered on the copper. As I never intended to use this barrel (FV12 bought for the action and trigger) I sold it.

I'd be interested in hearing from other FV12 owners, especially those with borescopes.

Re: Getting started

Reply #35
I shoot 2 of the fv12 barrels. One a 223 and the other a 22-250. They look like a train track in there but with break in and a couple hundred rounds down each their both tack drivers.. they collect copper more than my custom barrels do but their easy enough to keep clean and keep shooting great.. this is all teslong bore scope and lyman bore scope verified.. i will burn them out before i put custom barrels on either of them..
Grant

Re: Getting started

Reply #36
Not my experience with this barrel.

My FV12 barrel, the first factory barrel I've used in quite some time, was a fouler. Copper upon copper. VERY difficult to remove. About 200+ rounds, including break-in and vigorous cleanings between range sessions, did nothing to "smooth it out", as the copper just layered on the copper. As I never intended to use this barrel (FV12 bought for the action and trigger) I sold it.

I'd be interested in hearing from other FV12 owners, especially those with borescopes.

I understand what you are saying and agree with you. If I were to buy a 12FV it would be for the action and I'd sell the stock and barrel to fund upgrades.
It would be an ass ache but if I were determined to use the factory barrel and wanted to take the time I would shoot and clean every round 10x then shoot five round groups and clean between them. You have to keep the copper off the lands for the bullet to smooth it out. Once its coppered up another 20-40 rounds is going to do very little to smooth it up.
The final finish would be the short cut to this process. I doubt the whole set would be necessary, a few of each grit should do it. If the barrel is so bad it won't the money from selling the barrel and savings from not buying the final finish kit could be put towards a good barrel.

I've still got the factory barrel on my Savage Target Magnum .338 Lapua. It looked like the train track everyone describes and caught a lot of copper as well. After fireforming 200 pieces of brass with 250g SMKs I believe it's settled and is very smooth as well now plus it cleans much easier now. I'll start load development with the 250g Berger Hybrids soon. My point is brass needs fireformed and barrels need settled before a consistent load can be found so this is a good time to spend some extra time with a cleaning rod and bronze brush to help smooth the barrel out.

As little as some people who buy these guns actually shoot & clean a lot of them will never get the barrel settled or smoothed out anyway. For a person that can shoot, reload quality ammo and plans on shooting a lot sell the take off barrel and screw on a good one.   
Dave

Re: Getting started

Reply #37
The good news for beaverine is that the factory barrel will be very easy and relatively low cost to replace with a much higher quality tube when budget permits. (The factory barrel did shoot pretty well, although I can't say I optimized handloads.)

I have a non-lapped, button-rifled SS barrel in .308 (Green Mountain) that is very similar in appearance to the FV12 (reamer marks through the barrel) that I plan on doing the firelapping routine on this summer. I'll borescope and record before/during/after and report results. In retrospect, I wish I'd done this on the FV12 barrel.

Re: Getting started

Reply #38
Beaverine dont let these guys convince you you need a new barrel for your model 12.. take care of the one thats on it and it will serve you well for many many rounds.. 😁
Grant

Re: Getting started

Reply #39
Beaverine dont let these guys convince you you need a new barrel for your model 12.. take care of the one thats on it and it will serve you well for many many rounds.. 😁

Says the most prolific barrel buyer on the forum 😂
Dave

Re: Getting started

Reply #40
He's got a point, Grant....   ;)
Just don't buy a Savage and no worries. LOL

 

Re: Getting started

Reply #41
Savages are all i will buy.. not one of my barrel purchases have been due to a savage barrel that caught too much copper .most have been for new builds..
Grant

Re: Getting started

Reply #42
Thanks Gman.  No bore scope here, but I bought it to shoot it.  I'll do a proper break in, but then I plan on wearing it out.  THEN maybe a shiny new barrel, with the added benefit that maybe by then I'll be better able to appreciate the difference.  Ya gotta remember, I'm as green as a spring hay field.