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DIY Ballistic Chronograph?


  I've found plans for 2 different chronographs, the first one has it's own IR-LED transmitter so it's not dependent on external lighting conditions, etc.

https://gerritsendesign.wordpress.com/2016/07/28/ballistic-chronograph/

No price listed, but would appear to be well under $100.  All code provided on G-Drive for Arduino.

http://nutsvolts.texterity.com/nutsvolts/201703/?folio=18&pg=18#pg18
https://www.nutsvolts.com/magazine/article/March2017_Ballistic-Chronograph
Parts list shows around $65.

 Anybody seen anything like this or how well they work?   Since the first one has IR LED on it, I would assume it would work fairly well as opposed to all the issues I read on the passive ones.  Looks easy enough to build, he provided full circuit diagrams.

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #1
That looks like a neat project from the write up.

Ironically, I was talking to an RSO at the range yesterday about chronographs as he'd just acquired a Labradar and noticed I was using mine. He made the comment which, paraphrased, said the new chronys are so convenient, accurate, affordable etc that a person can't give away a perfectly good Oehler these days.

While it's true that a shooting sport chronograph's primary function is to accurately record bullet speed, one needs to consider how much time and effort does it take to get setup so that bullets actually go through the gates, and how much manual work is needed to collect data for post-processing.

As much as I like to fiddle with electronics myself, time behind the trigger is sufficiently valuable, I'd rather save and buy a purpose-built chronograph than make my own. But that's just me.
Chris

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #2
If you really like to tinker, then go for it.
If your just trying to save a little money, not worth it.
Just buy a Magnetospeed for about $170.00 and call
it a day.  It will give you no problems and read accurately
everytime, all the time.  No walking around jacking with setup, back
and forth, getting it right, worrying about sun light.

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #3
Thanks. My first look was pricing over $350... So, yeah, while I like to tinker, price was the driver.  Plus, if it worked really well.. could perhaps mass produce for other members as well. :).
 Just found one for $180, so must depend on version.  I'll probably just buy it.  Thanks.

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #4
Yes, their are to versions. 90% of the people can get away with the cheaper one
They almost do the same thing. Just more bells and whistles.
I bought the 170$ one and never thought I needed the other.
The next step would be the Labradar.

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #5
Magnetospeed may affect the behavior of the device-under-test, a gun in this case, if that matters to the OP. I have seen cheap, simple methods though to mount it to the bench instead of the barrel, again, more fiddling :)

Reloading has so many rabbit holes I lost count, lol.
Chris

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #6
Chris, yes the Magnetospeed with change the POI but if I got
the load narrowed down, then I just load a couple extra and
place it on the barrel after grouping and check speed then.
I hardly ever check speed when doing a grouping test.
I'm not pushing the load that far and if I am, then I'll
load one per load and see what speed it's running
first off and narrow the field down that way. 

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #7
I have a theory about Labradar; if I'm casually shooting and just wanting to collect some velocity data, it will work perfectly. Now, if I have a limited number of rounds loaded for a ladder and I REALLY want velocity data, well, "Failure to acquire...press enter to continue"   :'(

On balance I still feel pretty good about Labradar, especially after I shot the Magnetospeed bayonet one time  >:(
Chris

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #8
Yeah, I read a lot of reviews it has to be mounted exactly right to work.

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #9
I have a theory about Labradar; if I'm casually shooting and just wanting to collect some velocity data, it will work perfectly. Now, if I have a limited number of rounds loaded for a ladder and I REALLY want velocity data, well, "Failure to acquire...press enter to continue"   :'(

On balance I still feel pretty good about Labradar, especially after I shot the Magnetospeed bayonet one time  >:(

Thats not the units fault its the operators fault.  When set up properly, you dont get that issue.
The only thing better than me spending my own money, is my friends spending it for me

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #10
Thanks. My first look was pricing over $350... So, yeah, while I like to tinker, price was the driver.  Plus, if it worked really well.. could perhaps mass produce for other members as well. :).
 Just found one for $180, so must depend on version.  I'll probably just buy it.  Thanks.


If  buy something and put it together for a hundred bucks and it doesnr work, not reliable, no way to know its calibrated, it would be cheaper to buy a magnetto speed for another hundred bucks in the first place.

Buy once cry once
The only thing better than me spending my own money, is my friends spending it for me

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #11
Thats not the units fault its the operators fault.  When set up properly, you dont get that issue.

I'm not casting blame.

I set the machine up the same every time, most times it runs flawlessly, occasionally it gets picky, when it does I check my setup first. There is no denying the machine is quite particular about it's setup.

I've also experienced complications when several Labradar units are in use at the same time. Again, sometimes it doesn't seem to matter much, other times it does.
Chris

Re: DIY Ballistic Chronograph?

Reply #12
I'm not casting blame.

I set the machine up the same every time, most times it runs flawlessly, occasionally it gets picky, when it does I check my setup first. There is no denying the machine is quite particular about it's setup.

I've also experienced complications when several Labradar units are in use at the same time. Again, sometimes it doesn't seem to matter much, other times it does.

Even when I set things up right, I may still get an error message, but rare.
There is another guy at the club that uses a Lab. We both have ours set to
different frequencies, to avoid any errant triggers. So far so good, and his
favorite bench is 15' away from mine.....The main problem I have with a Lab
Radar is the curious onlookers eating into my bench time. Sort of like putting
out a sugar cube and then there is a swarm of flies !!
Keeping my bad Kharma intact since 1952