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Topic: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading (Read 790 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #15
Lizardman: Yes my loads are 42.7 but they are on the edge and probably not the safest place to be but in my rifle there is no heavy bolt lift, flatted primers and I for one was never looking to shoot it the fastest either it just happened to shoot very well there. It did shoot good at 42.5 with H4350 as well and maybe should have just stayed there..

If it were me id do what other have suggested and start around 42.0 grains about .020 off the lands and go in .3 tenths of grain increments so 42.0, 42.3, 42.6.  Or you could go another route if you have a chronograph and do the ten shot ladder test or abbreviated version "7-shot" and load them in .1 grain increments so 42.0, 42.1, 42.2, 42.3, 42.4, 42.5, etc looking for the flat spots in velocity or the ones that vary the least in Feet Per Second so lets say 42.2 is 2726 fps and 42.3 is 2730 fps you know there is probably a node there.. 

It seems in the 6.5 creedmoor there is usually a node in a 24 inch barrel at 2730 fps or very close to that. I think the factory ammo is about the same velocity with 143 eldx's. Good luck!!
Marvin

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #16
Thanks for the info. I did not mean to call you out, I just didnt want to take credit for an extremely accurate load.

And that's where I'm stuck is that that load is so accurate, but is it safe enough to use it hunting? Accuracy is more important than velocity, so maybe I should go back down to the 41.5 where it was recently accurate but well within safe pressure.

I really appreciate all the info guys, as I'm relatively new to reloading.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #17
lizard man- Oh I didn't think you were calling me out so no harm there.. What I was trying to do is just let everyone know that although it might be semi-safe in my rifle it might not be in anyone else.  ;)

Like I said before the factory ELD-X is listed at 2700 fps, so usually 2700-2730 is a good node and where alot of folks shoot their rifles..  I know you will find the sweet spot in your rifle and be extremely happy.. And if there is no signs of pressure at 42.7 and its the accuracy you want then just stay there

I just thought of something as I read Leadhammer's post below: My gun is a custom rifle with a bartlein barrel and I shoot "Nosler" brass. I do know that brass does make a difference in a lot of instances. Hence: Alpha/Lapua you cant stuff as much powder in them because the cases are thicker. so figure it was worth noting so folks that read this understand what works in one's rifle could fail extremely bad in someone elses..

I have learned so much on this form from all of you and all I can say is: Thank YOU ALL for your knowledge and keeping us safe or safer by giving us advise on what might work and to always start low and "SLOWLY" work your way up.
Marvin

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #18
I have great accuracy at 42-42.3, but I get ejector swipe there, and my Hornady brass was growing a bunch.  Now with the 143 Eldx I'm at 41.5, and with 140 Berger VLDh, I'm at 41.2.  Both H4350.  My brass is much happier, and I am just getting into some loose primer pockets after 9x fired. I cut the brass in half again and case head separation is not a problem whatsoever.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #19
  Does the pressure also depend on the jump distance to the lands?   As I understand it, if there is a larger jump, there is lower initial spike of pressure. 

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #20
I loaded mine at COAL 2.804. Not sure if that is anywhere close to the lands in my rifle. But as I said earlier, I did have a little bit of primer flattening.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #21
  Does the pressure also depend on the jump distance to the lands?   As I understand it, if there is a larger jump, there is lower initial spike of pressure. 


any time you move the bullet in or out it will change pressure... shorter will increase pressure and seating the longer will decrease pressure... to a point... once you get close to the lands then pressure will increase... and once you touch the lands or jam them in the lands you will get a big increase in pressure...that's why we don't like seating them within .005 from the lands... its easy to have one actually touching the lands and cause a big spike in pressure which can cause eratic groups... better off to stay .010 or more from the lands or jam them into the lands... which personally im not a fan of..
Grant

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #22
I have my 143 Eldx jumping a long ways, but at 41.8 of H4350, when doing a seating test, only making the BTOG shorter by .003" at a time, on test #4, I was into pressure. ( swipe ) This was too hot for me and got everything working nice at 41.5.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #23
  Does the pressure also depend on the jump distance to the lands?   As I understand it, if there is a larger jump, there is lower initial spike of pressure. 

No, seating deeper doesn't increase pressure, it lowers it; until silly deep. I know Berger used to claim such, but they also used to (possibly still do) estimate loads and pressures with QL, which long held and incorrect linear calculation about that.

Dr. Brownell long ago did pressure testing with seating depth, deeper allows more gas bleed-off around the bullet; unless you get REALLY deep and significantly affect the burning curve.

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j84/Darkker13/Mobile%20Uploads/seatingdepthvpressure_zpsspyuzho7.gif
I'm a firm believer in the theory that if it bleeds, I can kill it.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #24
No, seating deeper doesn't increase pressure, it lowers it; until silly deep. I know Berger used to claim such, but they also used to (possibly still do) estimate loads and pressures with QL, which long held and incorrect linear calculation about that.

Dr. Brownell long ago did pressure testing with seating depth, deeper allows more gas bleed-off around the bullet; unless you get REALLY deep and significantly affect the burning curve.

http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j84/Darkker13/Mobile%20Uploads/seatingdepthvpressure_zpsspyuzho7.gif
Depending on powder/bullet seating deep can easily create over pressure situations. I do ladders changing depth from deep to .020 to lands with the same powder charge to understand what a given bullets pressure tendencies are as well as finding valleys of velocity that tend to mimic accuracy. Lee load data lists min. coal by bullet weight and I find their numbers are a good guide not to go below.
   Lizard Man, on problems with heavy charges safety first and barrel/brass life are my concerns. I think by adjusting coal you can match or beat your "accurate load'' with a lower charge and do good for the life of your barrel and extend the number of times brass can fired.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #25
i get 2745fps in my 22" browning abolt2 using 41.5 grains of H4350, hornady brass and federal 210 primers loaded to mag length. cant remember off hand think its like a .040" jump. works great on elk and deer. runs 30-40fps faster than the hornady bthp with the same powder charge in that rifle.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #26
i get 2745fps in my 22" browning abolt2 using 41.5 grains of H4350, hornady brass and federal 210 primers loaded to mag length. cant remember off hand think its like a .040" jump. works great on elk and deer. runs 30-40fps faster than the hornady bthp with the same powder charge in that rifle.

That's outstanding velocity all things considered, I'd have figured more like 2620-2630 or so fps with a 22" pipe.
Chris

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #27
Yeah that seems to be great velocity at 2745 with a 22 inch pipe with 41.5  grains. As I'm getting 2730 FPS out of a 24 inch barrel with 42.5 grains  H-4350. Some barrels are faster than others and maybe mine is just a slow poke like myself..  :D
Marvin

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #28
How many rounds do you have down the barrel now ?  What is your cleaning regimen ?
If your going to be a Bush Alaskan You need a perfect winter rifle. The Ruger M77 Hawkeye SS in 6.5 Creedmoor is mine.<br>You are being watched.

Re: Nosler 140gr Accubond reloading

Reply #29
not sure if the question was for me or not. but i have around 1000 rounds down the tube of that rifle. nothing special in the cleaning department. when the accuracy starts to open up i fill the barrel with "wipe out" and let it sit over night. put a few patches through then put a bunch of "patch out" out on a nylon brush and run it through a bunch of times. then follow up running more patches through. then soak a patch in some "patch out" and look for any copper remnants. usually that rifle is good. it cleans out nice. then put some "m pro 7" on a patch and run it through check for copper left over again. usually all good. and run one or two dry patches after that. i use a cheap nickel plated jag and nylon brush.