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Topic: good feeling (Read 160 times) previous topic - next topic

good feeling

I finally found time to prep 75 Hornady brass last night, I have been wanting to test that tuner.......... anyway I think this is my best go yet. 75 brass, 0 designated to sighters. All of the body die press felt good and results were good, same of course with the collet die. I did find three primer pockets too loose so I reused the primers and squished the brass. Cut one in half again and no case head separation concerns at all still. 12th firing.

Re: good feeling

Reply #1
Squished? The loose pockets. With the pin and steel ball method?
I've tried it when I find a loose one. I have a primer pocket go no go gauge I bought from Brownells. It is deaf on if you find an easy seater then I remove the primer for refuse and the no go side of the gauge will slide in. Only then do i try and snug them with the pin & ball method. Once the go gauge fits snug then the primer will also. Sometimes the go in and finish with a quick jetk (they get by whatever wad tightened and then finish going in real easy. I use the gauge on almost any batch, new or old.
11X Grandfather
Part time Savagesmith

Re: good feeling

Reply #2
I have no idea about the tool or method you mention. Need to look it up to understand.
When I find a loose primer pocket I just crunch the case mouth with plyers so I don’t reuse it. I typically cut one of the discarded ones to check the case over for separation.

Re: good feeling

Reply #3
I have no idea about the tool or method you mention. Need to look it up to understand.
When I find a loose primer pocket I just crunch the case mouth with plyers so I don’t reuse it. I typically cut one of the discarded ones to check the case over for separation.
On another forum (LRH) there was several posts on tightening loose primer pockets. The method used a ball bearing placed on some sort of anvil and a snug fitting pin punch placed in the case mouth down against the web above the pocket. The pocket was themself centered on the ball bearing and the pin then struck with a blow or several blows from a hammer. I never understood how the forces applied could actually tighten the pocket. I tried it and it definitely will snug up a portion of the pocket.most likely it gets smaller closest to the case head near the head stamp.
The tool a primer pocket go, no-go gauge is available from Brownells and possibly other sources, very useful.
I too have a box of scrapped brass. Crushing the case mouth as you mentioned was one of my old tricks when finding unusable brass, either partial case separations or loose pockets. Borderline pockets when noticed at seating were often Sharpie marked or noted on my load data sheets.
11X Grandfather
Part time Savagesmith