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Reloading start up

Started by visserj, January 12, 2022, 03:13:16 AM

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visserj

This is my first time with a forum so if this is not the right way to start a question to the group than please feel free to educate me. I am wanting to reload for my 6.5 CM Tikka and looking to set up a very accurate load for hunting out to around 500 yards. I reloaded a little about 30 years ago but it seems much more technical now then what I remember. I am looking for information about the following.
What is the best brass to buy -
Is it better to buy brass with a small or larger primer hole -
What is the preferred primer -
How often do the case necks need to be annealed and is there a inexpensive way to accomplish this -
Is a tumbler required and do you tumble each time -
I was considering the Horrnady ELD X - 143 gr bullet for hunting
The biggest question is what dies to buy and use ? Brand and how many are required (I see 2 or 3 are required), what type of dies and there seems to be a vast selection bushing/no bushing et cetera and I am very confused !!
There is something about load development that I don't quite understand where you try and find a stable node of velocity and then work on bullet seating depth for accuracy -

Thanks

gman47564

Visserj welcome to the forum.. my responce is just my opinion and suggestions.. to start with buy a couple reloading manuals and read the front part of them until you understand all their is to reloading from the manuals.. also spend some time in the reloading section of this forum.. it has answers to about every question you have.. with that said theirs lots of guys here that can and will help you along the way.. my opinion on some of your questions are.. size of primer pocket really isnt a big deal.. getting good brass is.. i recommend peterson, alpha or lapua.. as far as dies go for the 6.5 creedmore i use a redding body die to bump the shoulder and size the case. Then a lee collet die to size the necks.. a forester micro seating die to seat the bullets.. also on some calibers i shoot i use a non bushing forester competition full length sizing die to size the cases and a forester micro seating die to seat the bullet.. some guys tumble their brass and some just wipes them down with alcohol i think (not sure what they use to wipe them down with) i like clean shiny brass so i tumble in stainless steel pins.. annealing is another thing guys have different aproaches to.. i anneal every time.  Some do every 4th or 5th cycle.. some dont at all.. getting a routine down takes trial and error.. and time.. as you develop your routine you learn new things and your routine will evolve.. just remember it's a journey..
Grant

bikemutt

With respect to primers, it may come down to what you can find versus what you want, for now at least. If you can find SRPs for instance, that might guide your brass decision. 
Chris

HufD63

It's all about how much you want to spend. A Lee 2, 3 or 4 die will get you going and make fine ammo for around $60 or less.
$120 ish should get a Forster FL and Microseater

Sparkling ammo is not more accurate than clean faded or oxidized rounds. Wipe it down with a clean rag throughout the process.

At the least get an Annealeze for the consistency to anneal.
Dave

VA-XBolt

While I'm a big fan of reloading, I think you need to ask yourself some questions and try to define your own expectations.

For example, what do you mean by "a very accurate load"?  1 MOA, 1/2 MOA, 1/4 MOA etc.?  My 6.5cm hunting rifle (not a Tikka) will shoot 1/2 MOA with the 143gr ELD-X Hornady factory ammunition and under 1/4 MOA with my own reloaded ammunition. That said, I started for the first several years by just using factory ammo, which also allowed me to build up some brass stock for later reloading.

How many rounds do you plan on shooting per year to gain and keep proficiency out to 500 yards? (assuming deer sized game here and ethical shooting) For the past 5 years, the deer I've harvested have all been at about a 100 yard range. Where I hunt, the maximum distance to even see deer is out at about 300 yards. I typically shoot about 100-200 rounds a year leading up to deer season working on positions, distance and skills with my hunting rifle.

Currently, as you likely know, both factory ammunition and reloading components are in short supply, with limited purchase options even if you can find what you're looking for. On top of the cost of reloading components, you have a somewhat steep initial cost curve to buy all the hardware to reload with, and the time spent to learn those skills required. Reloading press, dies, reloading scale, possibly annealing system, case trimmers etc.

So, if you're only looking at about 100'ish rounds a year for a hunting rifle, you certainly won't save money by reloading in the short term.

Bigmaico

Take a look at Starline brass.

Flash holes are drilled not punched. The 100 cases I bought were all the same length & very close in weight.

Primer pockets were good too! I got the large primer pocket version.

Just put 5 reloads through my 6.5 cm with no stretching. 

jvw2008


"Take a look at Starline brass.

Flash holes are drilled not punched. The 100 cases I bought were all the same length & very close in weight."

I'm not sure that statement is correct. Do you have a reference for that info? If I'm wrong I would like to know, but the last I heard, all flash holes are punch in all American brass including the very best made.

gman47564

I dug around for a little while trying to find that information.  But every thing i could find said the flash holes in the starline brass is punched in not drilled..
Grant

Bigmaico

Quote from: jvw2008 on January 12, 2022, 09:15:53 AM"Take a look at Starline brass.

Flash holes are drilled not punched. The 100 cases I bought were all the same length & very close in weight."

Well if they aren't drilled when I put my debuting tool in the flash hole they all fit snugly & had no burs so I assumed that they were drilled. My bad.

I'm not sure that statement is correct. Do you have a reference for that info? If I'm wrong I would like to know, but the last I heard, all flash holes are punch in all American brass including the very best made.