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Topic: Savage bolts (Read 519 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #15
We might all be working on our savage bolts. A while back I read an article on how this one guy lightens the lift. He cuts the spring so that relaxed length equals the compressed length. I had to try it. I w I'll dog up the link if i can find it.
The bolt can now be opened with one finger. Although it does not habe enough snooze to set off a primer. [email protected] firing pin spring compressor I made a couple of years ago is handy to disassemble the firing pins but will not assist in reassembly to the point that I wanted to put a full length spring back on the one that I had shortened.
11X Grandfather
Part time Savagesmith

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #16
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/member.php?u=3008
This is the link that heads you into the modification I posted about.
It worked to lighten bolt lift bit weakened the strike force considerably.
On the savage sight it has been recommended never to shorten or cut coils off the spring.
11X Grandfather
Part time Savagesmith

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #17
A while back i had the little retaining washer with the slots in it broke.. i replaced it and put it back together and got light strikes on the primer.. doesnt take backing it off much and it wont ignite the primer.. dont think i would clip any coils off.. lol
Grant

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #18
Next is the bolt body..  where the cocking pin sets in there theirs like a slight hook.. polish that hook.. it doesnt hurt to even take a little of that hook off with a fine stone and then polish it.. just dont get carried away and remove all the hook..

Be very careful here as Grant says... If you take too much off the "hook" your rifle can start randomly de cocking. I've had it happen with one that was done by a Smith and one done by myself.
I've never had a discharge because its always happened when the cocking pin cleared the action on the ejection stroke. At this point you have to remove the bolt and manually decock it by hand. Huge PITA especially in a match.
Dave

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #19
I run about a dozen savage actions and im not sure any of them feel the same.. lol the 111 i built my 6 5x284 on couldnt be any better. Its tight and smooth as can be.. as good as any custom action that i have ran..

I too have or have had a dozen + Savage Actions, the really smooth ones that stand out in my memory were the 12 fv and a 110 that were timed and trued by Fred @ SSS another was my dual port Target that i did some work similar to what youre describing here. Ive got a model 10 that came from Stealth rifle and a 112 Target Magnum that ive not touched that are both very smooth.
After those there were several 10s & 11s, 110s & 111s that were pretty crappy and even though polishing and lift kits made them better the were just less crappy.

Now as to your quote above I have a Borden &  Panda customs that I've had a few years now and probably put at least 7000+ rounds downrange between the two. The thought that my smoothest Savage is comparable to either has never crossed my mind. I have no idea what customs you've handled or the extent of your handling of them but I could never make that statement because it's not been my experience.

I've competed with, I've competed against and I've beat and been beaten by Savages in competition so they are capable and im not attacking them LOL my point is once you've ran a Borden, Panda or Bat there are so many refinements that add up to the total experience that smoothness is just a small part of the overall experience.

For the guy who does not want to or cannot spend the money to go custom I get it and there are benefits to the Savage platform. I believe you said something to the effect you get what you get. Almost all of them require modification and some never really get there in spite of all the modification. So by the time a guy does possibly not get luck and sorts through a few of them modding them to improve them time and money is a wasting LOL and again i understand on the other hand this is part of the DIY appeal for many as it was for me at one time. 

This is my opinion based off my experience so it can't be wrong and please notice nowhere in my post did I say you were wrong. Just offering my experience which happens to differ from yours.



Dave

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #20
When Dave had the "hook" problem, i tried to duplicate it with my dremmel and did. I was able to grind a new "hook" and make the bolt body usable again.
11X Grandfather
Part time Savagesmith

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #21
That hook has to retain a high point on it for sure.. but taking a hair off the top of it with a fine wet stone and polishing it only improves it..
Grant

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #22
When Dave had the "hook" problem, i tried to duplicate it with my dremmel and did. I was able to grind a new "hook" and make the bolt body usable again.

I remember you doing that. I think I reground one of mine as well but opted to get a new body. At the time i was concerned that even though i may have fixed that problem I questioned whether it would shorten the firing pin stroke thereby lessening the tension on the spring. I was also concerned I may have altered the timing of the whole firing mechanism and just replaced the body with a new one. I removed a little "hook" on that one and polished it up but it wasn't as nice as the old one before it started to fail.

Dave

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #23
That hook has to retain a high point on it for sure.. but taking a hair off the top of it with a fine wet stone and polishing it only improves it..

I think everyone is in agreement on that I was only trying to prevent someone from making the more is better mistake. There is a point of failure.
Dave

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #24
Yep i tried to emphasize that in my original post..  ;)
Grant

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #25
Think I have solved my ftf problem.
For about a year I have noticed extreme difficulty seating primers with my press and have even resorted to chamfering the pockets. During depriming ivealso noticed that the anvil are separated from the cups most of the time.
Watching the process I noticed the case would always tip in the shell holder  to the same direction. I have a spare primer arm and priming pins.
After changing the primer pin the seating problem disappeared and the primers slide in astheyshould.  For some reason the primer pin was gouging its way in and catching on the side of the primer pocket. It his morning I found 1 loadedcasethatihadnot pulleddown. I pulled the bullet and carefully deprived and caughttheprier.sureenough the anvil hadseparated from the cup. Obviously being installed at an angle deformed the primer to a point theanvils became loose.
It is a relief to know that my 50 year old presses are the root cause of all those "clicks". It certainlyhasbee plaguing meforsome period of time and will save that changer step bbeforeseatig primers. I had used my Wilson chamber too in a battery poweredhanddrilll to remodel those pockets. The difficulty seating didn't go away completely with the chamfer, the primer pin must have still be catching and primers went in rather abruptly. On a few I had to lightly spin the case in a 320 grit emerypapero smoothoutthe chamber alittle.
Once I tightenedheadspace and adjusted firing pin protrusionon a couple of them the ftfs also disappeared.
11X Grandfather
Part time Savagesmith

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #26
Last couple of days has been a reloading room marathon. Have 50 243 ready to roll + 65 6.5-06 and 60 6.5 creedmoor along with 55 6.5/257 Bob ackley!
I'm getting used to the lyman 5t powder throw, it seems plus or [email protected] half a grain, I weigh every throw with my 55 year old bonanza beam scale.
The priming snafu was slowing me down before. All the primers slipped in great today. I'm several weeks behind or I would be hunting in wyoming by now.
Friday I'm headed to wisconsin. A couple of my grandkids will be participating in the youth hunt there this weekend. I hope to get some archery hunting in myself.
11X Grandfather
Part time Savagesmith

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #27
Hope you have a great time!!!!

Re: Savage bolts

Reply #28
I have 2 Savage rifles.  A 10 BA Stealth in 6.5 Creedmoor with a bolt lift that is a real B---h to run and an 11 that started life in 223 Rem. but now has a new bolt head and is chambered in 6BR-Norma.  When we changed bolt heads and barrels I smoothed the cocking ramp and lapped the bolt lugs.  This improved bolt lift effort noticeably but it still can't be done with one finger like my trued and timed Rem. 700.  I have seen some custom action F-Class rifles that seem to require almost no effort to close, and that 700 comes the closest to that, but is not it's equal.