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Different Barrels

Over the past several months as I've been doing a more thorough cleaning, I've noticed a clear difference between barrel manufactures and how easy they are to clean.  There are a few where getting the carbon out is a long process while others clean up with with only a moderate amount of effort.  These are all after market barrels from reputable suppliers.  Have others seen this?

One thing to note, which is how I break in the barrel....that is I don't.  I don't do the shoot once-clean once process.  I will go and take 10-20 shots, usually to zero and get some initial data, and then go and clean it well.  After that, I'm done with any break-in.  In thinking about this, depending on how well the barrel has been lapped, I could see that differences in the finish could have an impact on how the carbon will bond to the metal.  So doing the shoot once-clean once could help prevent this initial build up and perhaps remove some of the initial roughness.
Bob
If everything seems under control......you're just not going fast enough

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #1
A couple things for you to ponder on bob.. you say some barrels clean easier than others.. could this be the effects of different types of powders used in them and or the efficiency of the powders burn.. alot of powders when run in the lower nodes will soot up and leave more carbon behind than they do in a higher node in my opinion.. another thing you might try the next time you buy a barrel that seems a little harder to clean than others do is give it a proper breakin if thats such a thing.. i believe it is.. shoot one and clean for 3 times. Then shoot 3 and clean 2 times then shoot 10 and clean. Then have at it.. see if that barrel cleans easier after that..
Grant

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #2
Good thoughts on the powder and charge.  The barrels definitely used different powders so something to consider.   I'm think I will also haul my cleaning stuff along and do the barrel break-in drill at the range.  Not looking forward to that but I think it would be a good thing for me to try and see what results I see.
Bob
If everything seems under control......you're just not going fast enough

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #3
I think it would be also bob.. and if you see no difference in how they clean afterwards then i may quit doing the break in thing..
Grant

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #4
I've had the good fortune to break a few new ones in . A few I didn't break in , I won't make that mistake again. I use a mild charge of a cool burning powder and junk bullets. Five rounds is usually enough to do it . From there I just go slow. Plus I'm always a little goosy of the first round out of a freshly screwed on barrel. It all boils down to each his own.

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #5
I do a break in but it has become less stringent over the years.

I used to shoot one and clean until it quit catching copper then shoot 3 and clean once or twice. Now I pretty much shoot 1 and clean, then 2 and clean then 3 and clean and I call it broke in.

I always have my cleaning gear along and clean at the range on a warm barrel so it's not a hassle and the barrels usually clean up easier.
Dave

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #6
My Savage break in, I just did the shoot 1, clean, 2 clean,  stopped at five rounds, then cleaned every five twice. It shoots well for a factory barrel, it does copper up but it goes to 75 rounds before I feel bad and clean it. ( still groups well ) 

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #7
I've noticed that to some extent also.  However I also find some barrels just clean easier within a given manufacturer.  The barrel I just finished development on cleans out in 15 minutes with little patching.  I have other Bartlein's that take a bit more effort and still will have a couple of grooves that hold a carbon/copper layer streak that is almost impossible to remove.  I have a Schneider that fouls so badly that it was gaining 100+ fps in 150rds and kept climbing in velocity until I gave up on it at around 1200rds (the other sits in the safe until I figure what to use it for....an axle perhaps? ::) ).

Re: Different Barrels

Reply #8
I've noticed that to some extent also.  However I also find some barrels just clean easier within a given manufacturer.  The barrel I just finished development on cleans out in 15 minutes with little patching.  I have other Bartlein's that take a bit more effort and still will have a couple of grooves that hold a carbon/copper layer streak that is almost impossible to remove.  I have a Schneider that fouls so badly that it was gaining 100+ fps in 150rds and kept climbing in velocity until I gave up on it at around 1200rds (the other sits in the safe until I figure what to use it for....an axle perhaps? ::) ).
Is the easy cleaning barrel the new steel?