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Topic: Last day of season prep- food plots in (Read 95 times) previous topic - next topic

Last day of season prep- food plots in

In a 800 acre lease with four other members in north central Louisiana.  We have been working for weeks.  Mowing, turning dirt, lime, fertilizer and stand prep.  Put down 400+ pounds of seed today.  Has been raining the last week so it was time.  Mix included elbon rye, oats, wheat, brassicas and white clover.  Prime rib is cheaper but not nearly as much fun.
If you have the shot, take it.

Re: Last day of season prep- food plots in

Reply #1
Sounds like a fun outing! Good luck 👍

Re: Last day of season prep- food plots in

Reply #2
Sorry Sportacus. That last post was intended for Gman and his coyote hunt.

I’ve been watching some programs on the outdoor channel over the last few weeks. When I was a kid in whitetail country we used the edges of soybean and corn fields for deer stands. I’m in mule deer country now and tree stands and food plots aren’t in the works. The shows I’ve been watch have been real educational. You have to know the character of the ground, make the necessary soil nutrient changes and then work your butt off to make a top quality food plot ready to hunt right on time for the season opening. Hope all your efforts are super fruitful for you guys.

Re: Last day of season prep- food plots in

Reply #3
Jerry,
Was trained by some awesome professors to be a deer manager, but never used the degree.  U.S. Army came along and said they would pay for my education if I would commit 4 years of my life to them.  The rest is history. 
Have been in this lease for six years and have taken one deer.  A four year old 3 point.  I can't help myself.  Old man that wants to shoot culls and mature, 4+ year old bucks.  Already getting pictures of two "cowhorns."  3-4 years old.  We do not shoot spikes or does on this lease but those two need to be freezer bound. Bad, bad, I mean bad genetics. Have a new member whining that there are too many does. He gone. However, when I go to south Texas or the Panhandle and the outfitter puts me on doe patrol, happy to oblige. Inventory/science based. At the point in my hunting life where I get great pleasure from a new hunter, lady or child taking a deer.  I still like to shoot them and love the venison.  Will admit when I climb into a blind, say a little prayer that coyotes or feral hogs show up first.  Melancholy when I trip the trigger on a deer. Hard hearted malice when I touch the bang switch on Wiley or Porky .Makes me very happy to set up a property and grow the herd and improve the quality of the animals.  "If you build it, they will come."
P.S.  My favorite TV biologist is Steve Bartylla.  Manages a bunch of upper Midwest properties.  Common sense and highlights ways to accomplish your goals without depriving your wife and kids of life's essentials.
Please indulge  my stem winding response.
Wayne
If you have the shot, take it.

Re: Last day of season prep- food plots in

Reply #4
Ha! Enjoyed reading it. Always appreciated a Hunter who understands his responsibility to the sport.

Re: Last day of season prep- food plots in

Reply #5
Jerry,
Forgot to mention.  Got to do spot and stalk on two NM pronghorn hunts and mule deer/whitetails in TX Panhandle.  Loved it.  Put the wind in your face and test your rifle driving.
Wayne
If you have the shot, take it.

Re: Last day of season prep- food plots in

Reply #6
And stalking skills. Definitely a different challenge from whitetail - both have their own magic.

Re: Last day of season prep- food plots in

Reply #7
"Mean as a snake and sneaky as a cat."  Charlie Daniels Band, "The Legend of Wooley Swamp."  Apt descriptor for me, my brother and our chums that grew up pretty hard.  Most were smart enough to embrace academics, sports and military service to break the cycle.

Old and broken but can still "ease up" on my target.  Try to not to scare anybody because my heart might fail before theirs does.  :)) 
If you have the shot, take it.