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Topic: Competition Practice  (Read 2123 times) previous topic - next topic

Competition Practice

Vegas50 and I have been really making an effort to improve our performance in tactical precision matches. Were solid prone supported shooters so we have been keeping it off the belly and working of positional shooting! I feel like I have the barricade sorted out pretty well now and have made some ground on moving targets. I still have to make gains on seated stages, right now that is my biggest weakness.


















Re: Competition Practice

Reply #1
You guys are having waaaaaayyyy too much fun.   Some nice looking rifles, but I think you should take up a collection to buy the shooter with holes in his knees a new pair of pants.  Moving target tactical shooting...could you give an example of a moving target shooting stage?
 
The latest caliber or gear is no substitute for experience and skill.  Rifles and cartridges don't make hits-----shooters do.

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #2
We usually have a par time, something like 1 min depending on the number of rounds you have to shoot (usually 10). The target will be at a given range, we have been shooting at 500 meters lately. The most important thing is to know the target speed, the target Kurt uses is traveling back and fourth about 30 feet on a track @ 3 mph. The same speed as the average walk, I use a ballistic calculator (JBM) to run soft dope to give me a starting point. Since I don't have a moving target I have to fine tune my data during matches. I have it figured out to a 4.5-5 MOA lead on the target. I usually track the target and trap it at the ends of the track, its still something I need to greatly improve on.

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #3
JFC.....If you have any pictures of the moving target and track Kurt uses it would be helpful to see how he has it set up.   We do the "practical rifle" scenario thing at our club (mostly AR's) 25-100yds.    I dont know if we would be able to do a 500-600yd. moving target scenario at our range unless it would not compromise the range appearance for other uses/matches held there.   I feel "tactical rifle shooting" would increase our membership and better utilize our clubs long range facilities which are limited to 600 yards.  Do bolt and semi-auto's compete together in the same or seperate matches?  I appreciate your pictures, input/response.  
The latest caliber or gear is no substitute for experience and skill.  Rifles and cartridges don't make hits-----shooters do.

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #4
I don't have any pictures of the set up but think of mini rail road track that you lay out and put together. The cart is electric powered and has metal wheels that index onto the track. At each end of the track is a switch that sends it the over direction. It uses an electric motor and a chain drive, its set up with a second switch to where you can shoot a smaller target to start the mover. Sometimes the stage is one rounds to turn the mover on then you have to get your hits and turn it off before the end of your par-time. If you do not stop the mover by the end of the stage you are penalized.

In the match the semi-auto's and bolt's compete side by side. If you use detachable magazines he has a 5 round limit to help level the playing field for guys with internal magazines. Semi's autos have an obvious speed advantage but lack the razors edge accuracy. They do well but I haven't seen someone win with one yet.

Here are random pictures from past matches.

























Re: Competition Practice

Reply #6
JFC.......GREAT pictures and the range you have to shoot on..... makes me drool.  As far as razors edge accuracy goes, can you give me a realistic example of what a Tactical bolt action rifles can "average" group size at a long range target?  What are the accuracy requirements at a Tactical Precision Rifle range in order to be competitive?   I realize a lot depends upon the "nut behind the butt".
The latest caliber or gear is no substitute for experience and skill.  Rifles and cartridges don't make hits-----shooters do.

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #7
If you can hold a 1-1.5 MOA, make decent wind calls, can shoot well prone supported, seated and partially supported your pretty much good to go! The target sizes vary but they average about 2 MOA. I honestly think the advantage of a bolt gun is the slight accuracy/consistency gain giving the shooter a greater margin of error. Shooting under pressure does funny things to you. Some day's I feel locked in like I can't miss and others I can't make a good wind call to save my life. 

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #8
This afternoon 600yds. DPMS LR 6.5 Creedmoor a cold 21 degrees, 10-15 mph winds using bi-pod from bench.  Using a 4 round magazine I fired the upper 4 shot group.  Removed the magazine, reloaded with two rounds, made sight adjustment down fired on same target.  Upper group 2 3/8" outside edges, lower group 1.25" but its only two shots.  http://www.longrangebpcr.com/images/targetphoto01-02-11r.jpg  I didn't have many rounds with me as this was the first time shooting it at 600yds. and I just got some Hornady brass loaded to check out a new load.
The latest caliber or gear is no substitute for experience and skill.  Rifles and cartridges don't make hits-----shooters do.

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #9

This afternoon 600yds. DPMS LR 6.5 Creedmoor a cold 21 degrees, 10-15 mph winds using bi-pod from bench.  Using a 4 round magazine I fired the upper 4 shot group.  Removed the magazine, reloaded with two rounds, made sight adjustment down fired on same target.  Upper group 2 3/8" outside edges, lower group 1.25" but its only two shots.  http://www.longrangebpcr.com/images/targetphoto01-02-11r.jpg


That's plenty accurate for practical precision rifle matches! Search around for matches in your area and jump in! I check the Snipers Hide's Tactical Competitions section to keep in the loop whats going on in my area.

Those DPMS LR's are shooters right out of the box, I have a friend who has both the .308 and 6.5 Creedmoor and they are tack drivers.

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #10


That's plenty accurate for practical precision rifle matches! Search around for matches in your area and jump in! I check the Snipers Hide's Tactical Competitions section to keep in the loop whats going on in my area.

Those DPMS LR's are shooters right out of the box, I have a friend who has both the .308 and 6.5 Creedmoor and they are tack drivers.



Me shooting my DPMS 6.5 on the barricade with JFC in the background seated after a sprint to the shooting area.

As JFC stated they are plenty accurate to hold their own in competitions.  Im currently using it as my comp rifle while my bolt creed goes back for a new barrel.  I managed to get a 6th place with it out of about 30 shooters a few months back.

Nevermind the dumb looking 2h grip and the scope cover still stuck to the rifle  8)

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #11
Vegas throw that left hand up against the barricade with the forend between your thumb and forefinger and wrap remaining fingers around barricade while pushing forend right against the barricade. More stable. Also if the barricade is low enough kneel on your left knee and rest your right elbow on the right knee. Makes it more stable.

Here's a pic of the hand position. Barricade was too tall to use the knee/elbow.

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #12
Rob I'm sure you get this a lot but do you have any tips for seated shooting? My gun is a heavy pig and I actually rest the rifle on my knee/arm to support it. I ditched the traditional method and have had better luck with it. Any help is much appreciated! You going to SHOT by the way?

Re: Competition Practice

Reply #13
Great pics guys, that was a big match, with guys from SoCal and AZ in attendance.  Joe, Clint and I can show you a dozen supported and unsupported seated and kneeling positions.  Since you are in good shape you will be able to get in a nice low stable position.  Kneeling I personally hate (titanium rod in L leg from knee to ankle).   Mark