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Topic: Ladder Test For Scope Tracking Test (Read 75 times) previous topic - next topic

Ladder Test For Scope Tracking Test

Just wondering, yea I wonder a lot ;D , but here goes my wondering question.  Why do you have to fire rounds to check the tracking of a scope?  New rifle w/new scope.  Rifle and scope zeroed at 100 yds.  Now I set up a tall target with different aim points i.e. 4" apart in elevation and windage say 200 yds distance.  I then adjust my scope up/down & L/R to align with my marked aim points.  Would that not be checking the tracking capability/accuracy of the scope without having to fire rounds? I realize the rifle would have to remain stable during this evaluation.

CaptMarine
CaptMarine

Re: Ladder Test For Scope Tracking Test

Reply #1
Capt in theroy what your saying is correct if the turrets are hitting your marks.. however you dont really know until you put bullet holes on the target to confirm what the turret is telling you.. your turret may be showing a 2 minute come up but the bullet may be showing a minute and a half.. if its not tracking right the more you crank it up the farther off it can be.. so to know for sure if you're scope is tracking right you have to crank the scope up and let the bullet verify what the scope is saying..
Grant

Re: Ladder Test For Scope Tracking Test

Reply #2
My wandering way of thinking is it doesn't matter what the bullet tells you due to the fact that once that trigger is squeezed and that sequence of ignition is activated there are so many variables that come into play from one shot to the next.  Why then would you rely on the bullet to tell you that the scope is not tracking, meaning that it returns to the same point on the target once the cross hairs have been adjusted to a different target location and then returned to the same point by same number of turret  clicks in the opposite direction.  to me that is verifying the mechanical operation of the scope, regardless of what the bullet does.  That is why you have to adjust the scope again on any given day to have same point of impact.  All the variables that come into play with powder, primers, brass sizing, weights and etc.  The scope doesn't care about any of those variables.  If then you verify that the scope is mechanically tracking correctly without firing a shot, to me you would still have to adjust the scope for the rounds being fired since one day is not the same as the next.
CaptMarine
CaptMarine

 

Re: Ladder Test For Scope Tracking Test

Reply #3
Capt the reason for doing a tall target test is to verify that if you turn the turret up 4 minutes the point of impact raises 4 minutes.. or if you turn the turret up 10 minutes then the point of impact raises 10 minutes. And also that the point of impacts stay on that vertical line on the target.. just because the turret appears to be going up the amount you think it is doesnt mean the poi is going up the same.. thats why you do the test.. to make sure the poi is following the turret. Just because you hold the rifle some how on zero while you dial 4 minutes or 10 minutes or what ever you dial in it and it hits the mark doesnt mean a thing without a bullet hole there lining up with the mark also.. not sure how else to explain it..
Grant