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Topic: Question on annealing- (Read 688 times) previous topic - next topic

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #30
“I suspect taking a single one of these reloading steps and trying to measure how much it helps would be difficult or impossible.  But I believe they all help a little bit and added together they make a real difference.”

BINGO!

This AND both knowing and trusting your load in match conditions. These are the guys (and gals) that consistently pull away from the pack.
RIP Chris Cornell

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #31
Me and my buds are the odd ducks here. We shoot, anneal and then do our brass prep. I don’t see a need to decap and clean prior to annealing.
RPR 6.5 Creedmoor
Bergara 6 Creedmoor

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #32
Me and my buds are the odd ducks here. We shoot, anneal and then do our brass prep. I don’t see a need to decap and clean prior to annealing.

Not odd at all..... I only decap first because I don't want crud falling into my annealer; the cases enter it inverted.  When I had an AnnealEeze I would anneal prior to decap.

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #33
Me and my buds are the odd ducks here. We shoot, anneal and then do our brass prep. I don’t see a need to decap and clean prior to annealing.

If I recall correctly the Bench Source annealer recommends decapping first so the cases ride flat and don't wobble on possibly proud primers. I don't think it would matter with AMP or Annealeze machines.

Only other reason I see for annealing after cleaning is I find it easier to spot suspect pieces when they're clean; I discard them before any further processing.
Chris

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #34
If I recall correctly the Bench Source annealer recommends decapping first so the cases ride flat and don't wobble ...
They're just erring on the side of customer satisfaction.
Two of us using the Bench Source only clean the brass before running them thru.
We keep an eye out for wobblers, but only get but maybe one in a couple hundred.
We clean brass first to look for rejects early and to get any crud off the necks that might effect the heating process.
... rule #9 ...

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #35
That's why I clean first. To get the crud off the area to be annealed.  Harder to heat something up if it's dirty.
Grant

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #36
Not many folks seem to use the salt bath process but I have found it to be very efficient and cost effective.  I have the process down to where I do one case every 5 seconds and can crank out a couple hundred in a short time.  I like that the temp is very stable and continuously monitored.  The only variable during the process is that the salt level does drop as some of the salt does stay with each round....so may need to periodically add some additional salt.  But this only occurs when running a lot of brass.

I always decap as the first step,  anneal and then into the ultrasonic cleaner.  I may take some fine steel wool to the necks after the annealing step as part of my process for checking the necks for any cracks.  I just finished some brass this week.  The first picture is just after coming out of the salt annealing and the second is after the ultrasonic cleaning.  

Bob

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #37
They look good. Nice work

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #38
Not many folks seem to use the salt bath process but I have found it to be very efficient and cost effective.  I have the process down to where I do one case every 5 seconds and can crank out a couple hundred in a short time.  I like that the temp is very stable and continuously monitored.  The only variable during the process is that the salt level does drop as some of the salt does stay with each round....so may need to periodically add some additional salt.  But this only occurs when running a lot of brass.

I always decap as the first step,  anneal and then into the ultrasonic cleaner.  I may take some fine steel wool to the necks after the annealing step as part of my process for checking the necks for any cracks.  I just finished some brass this week.  The first picture is just after coming out of the salt annealing and the second is after the ultrasonic cleaning.  

Bob/quote] looks like you been doing some shooting bob...  hows the 243 doing..
Grant

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #39
I've got a Forster CoAx press.  Will the Lee universal decapping die work with my press?

 Or, do either (anyone) have another suggestion for which decap die to buy?  I know there are handtools (Frankfort?) to decap,

If you have a nice press and want to keep it that way I suggest using a Harvey Depriming Tool from www.harveydeprimer.com which is what I use and keep all the carbon and crap off of my presses and my workbench much cleaner.


Do not buy the Frankford handheld depriming tool as I tried one and wore it out before I ran 1000 cases through it including destroying 2 pins  with it. That is when I switched over to the Harvey Deprimer. Plus you can sit in front of the tv to deprime cases and pop the primers into a soup can. I like my press to stay clean which means less maintenance.

I use the Bench-Source annealer and absolutely love running it because I get to play with fire since my wife made me stop running with scissors!
Stop the Gun Rights Abuse @ #Me2A

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #40
If you have a nice press and want to keep it that way I suggest using a Harvey Depriming Tool from www.harveydeprimer.com which is what I use and keep all the carbon and crap off of my presses and my workbench much cleaner.


Do not buy the Frankford handheld depriming tool as I tried one and wore it out before I ran 1000 cases through it including destroying 2 pins  with it. That is when I switched over to the Harvey Deprimer. Plus you can sit in front of the tv to deprime cases and pop the primers into a soup can. I like my press to stay clean which means less maintenance.

I use the Bench-Source annealer and absolutely love running it because I get to play with fire since my wife made me stop running with scissors!

With a Co-ax press all the crud from depriming is contained as it’s directed into a drop tube which leads to a catch basin below at lowest point of press. Gravity takes care of the mess.
RIP Chris Cornell

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #41
"Bob/quote] looks like you been doing some shooting bob...  hows the 243 doing.."
Grant, thanks for checking in on the 243.  I have become very comfortable with it and have it pretty well tuned for the DTAC 115 bullets at 2980 fps.  I shot a steel clinic a few weeks past and the rifle did well.  When I had the time and stability, it was perfect....but that was not often the case with all of the different stuff that we had to shoot off of.   Between the 6.5CM and the 243 Win, that is pretty much all I shoot.....with some occasional time with the 204 Ruger.

Hope all is well,
Bob

 

Re: Question on annealing-

Reply #42
Just getting back to the thread I started.  Wow-ed by the replies.  Am still of two minds over whether to anneal.  But, the consensus is or seems to be to anneal after each firing (I go with rardoin, in being lazy, to keep track of when to) and the Annealeeze machine is favored.  Which is more in line with my pay grade.  Knowing me, I will probably end up annealing and go with the flow of the consensus here.   Thank you all so much for your views and also the order in which you worked in the annealing in your reloading work flow.  Much appreciated, lg